Behind the curtain of progress

Human Rights Watch (HRW) Asia Division only recently published the report “Untold miseries – Wartime Abuses and Forced Displacement in Burma’s Kachin State” on the situation in the Northern state of Burma. Continue reading

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What’s up Burma!?

Ever since the elections in November 2010, the news coverage has delivered more positive than negative headlines. Change is in the air, but so far the country still finds itself just on the way to change rather than in the actual process of implementing democratic principles. Continue reading

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Easiest way to spell reconciliation: S – O – R – R – Y

Reconciliation has been an overused word in Thailand the last couple of years. Unfortunately it became more like a New Years resolution – everyone is talking about it but hardly anyone actually does anything about it. “But next year for sure…”. Continue reading

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Do whatever you want, but give me food!

According to an article run by the Bangkok Post, Thais are more worried about food than they are about any political conflict about charter amendments. Continue reading

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ADB report on Climate Change and Migration in the Asia Pacific region

For those who are interested, the ADB just released their latest report on “Climate Change and Migration in the Asia Pacific region”. Continue reading

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Back Down South

Come on down and dance, If you get the chance,
We’re gonna spit on the rival. All I wanna know, 
Is how far you wanna go, Fighting for survival. 

“Back Down South”, by Kings Of Leon

I have been occupied with Security Studies lately and now, the latest news concerning some issues of this field of study in Thailand are, again, human rights and the still ongoing conflict in the Southern districts. Continue reading

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Hollywood, Vivaldi and Global Governance

I just finished watching “Spy Game”, not the latest movie but an interesting one. If you have the chance to watch it do so and enjoy the brilliant spy Robert Redford saving his old pal Brad Pitt from a precarious situation.

As I am not giving you enough material to read here these days, I thought you can do your own research on Global Governance while enjoying one of the soundtrack’s songs of the movie. The song is Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” which you will find here (41 mins).

The tool that should keep you entertained for a while is the “Global Governance Monitor” developed by the Council on Foreign Relations. It is a superb tool to explore the history of several pressing issues such as human rights, climate change, armed conflicts, terrorism and public health. You will find an extensive amount of material (documents, videos, interactive maps, etc) covering the history and development of each issue. You can start exploring here.

I am very busy doing my own research on other issues for the blog, but this will have to wait a little bit longer to be published. My apologies but enjoy the GGM. Peace and out.

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Update

There’s been more movement on our Facebook page these days than on the weblog itself.

If you want to follow, you will find the page here.

There will be a new post shortly.

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The Thai Spring 2012 (?)

“I do not agree with what you have to say, but I’ll defend to the death your right to say it.” (Voltaire)

Thailand is heading into yet another year full of turmoil. And the reason for this anxious time ahead is the lese majeste (LM) law as used in Thailand and other monarchies around the world. What the law is about, what the development in the very recent history has been and what the matter is these days, I will try to summarize in the following post. Continue reading

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The Burma spring in 2012?

Hello my dear readers,

I am back and 2012 is going to start with a Burmese edition.  Continue reading

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